Posts Tagged ‘Hobart’

Hobart Farmers Market

November 28, 2010

This morning I got up semi-early and visited the Hobart Farmers Market. Despite being established over a year ago, this was only my third time visiting, mainly because I usually work on Sundays or have other important “plans” (like writing assignments). Now that uni is over though, I can take advantage of my rare Sundays off and wander around the market!

 

Hobart Farmers Market view

 

The aim of the Market is to encourage the local market for high quality produce, and only local growers and producers are allowed to sell at the market.

There is always interesting things to see, like this colourful garlic:

 

 

Both me and my sister who was with me today love broccoli. Have you ever eaten the stem of the broccoli? Its delicious! Simply peel the tough skin off and slice up and munch away. I have often thought to use it in a salad or stirfry but it disappears so quickly from the chopping board there’s almost no hope of it ever landing in an actual dish! One day. We did buy some broccoli but it was only later that we saw these beauties with their long stems; this broccoli will definitely be in my future!

 

 

I’m also fond of radishes but I prefer to grow them myself, as I can harvest one at a time, rather than trying to use the whole bunch in a few days. But I can never resist taking photos of the bright red globes!

 

 

And who can resist a good bunch of carrots?? Not I. These are so orange and luscious!

 

 

And, almost my sole motivation for going to the market today: Peas!! Its pea season here in Tasmania and I look forward to it every year. I’m not growing any this year, due to a combination of lack of space and time, so when I saw them at the market today I snapped them up!

 

 

More green things in the form of some juicy-looking mixed lettuce leaves:

 

 

And the markets aren’t just for fresh fruit and veggies, you can also pick up meats, bread, poultry, oysters, cheeses, preserves and sauces, and… Flowers! Just like the Salamanca market on Saturdays, I always try to buy some locally grown flowers to brighten my dining room table. On offer today were some gorgeous Peonies in a range of pinks, from almost pure white to the brightest pink:

 

 

So I bought some of these bright pink ones, always a lover of bright coloured flowers. They should be fully open in a few days!

 

Anyone in Hobart and the surrounding area should really make a trip to the Hobart Farmers Market, and soon! Its an awesome venture and I love it there.

 

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A Garden Update

May 16, 2009

It was so cold & blustery outside today, but I hadn’t visited the garden for a few days so I thought I had better pay it a visit. So this afternoon the sun was coming & going between the clouds, so this would be a good a time as any to go outside.

There few a few tomatoes hanging on the vines still, but I think I am going to have to pull them out soon. Once they are close to ripening the wet weather quickly rots them and I end up throwing them onto the compost. A not-so-wonderful end for the last veggie of Summer in the garden. So it’s time for the Winter veggies to have their turn in the (low gloomy Winter) limelight.

Broadbean shoot

I sowed these broadbeans about 3 weeks ago from memory, and they have just shown up in the last few days. I guess it’s the cold that has delayed their germination, but I seem to be getting very good germination rates so I don’t really mind. I would have planted them sooner but I had Golden Nugget pumpkins here that just refused to die back like they were supposed to, and I didn’t want to damage the pumpkins by pulling them out prematurely. I’ve never grown these before so I’m interested to see if I’m going to need to stake them or not.

Pea blossom

My plan for an Autumn crop of peas is coming along nicely, with the first flowers appearing this week. Here’s hoping I get some pollination & some yummy peas in the next few weeks!

Carrots freshly pulled

I had sown a small row of carrots before I planted the cabbage seedlings (in top left corner of the photo), and, being my usual impatient self, I just planted the cabbage seedlings on top because I didn’t want to have to wait for another area of the garden to free up. But it has worked out okay as an accidental catch crop, because now that the cabbage leaves have almost started to cover the space in between each plant, the carrots are just about ready. Well, for baby carrots anyway! I have a few in there still, so the next lot I pull will hopefully be a bit bigger. I have 2 rows that are 4 weeks old also, and my last sowing (2 rows each of St Valery and Mini Round) have sprouted this week. I am determined not to run out of carrots before Summer this time!

Parsnips & carrots

Out of sheer curiosity (and also because I am terribly impatient) I pulled two parnips as well. These were sown on the 28th of January, and I was very surprised at the time because they had all germinated after only 9 days. Covering them with plastic & onion bags really works, and have used it for my carrot seeds with great success too. So these ‘snips are about 3 months old now & still probably need another 3 months! They are cool though! I’m going to grate them up along with the carrots & make some veggie fritters. It will be my first time eating parsnips so I hope I like them!!

Parsnip leaves

Here’s a photo of the parsnip leaves, which was another thing that was a mystery to me when I first started growing them. They are a bit like flat leaved parsley, but several times larger, and the stem bases wrap around the newer middle leaves – you can see this a bit in the other photo. It’s kind of cool. Carrots do this too but because the stems are narrower it’s less noticeable.

Turnips

Also eagerly awaiting my first turnip!! This is the biggest one, I might roast it, or make some soup with the winter squashes I still have. Such excitement!

That’s it for now – I’ll see what the weather’s like tomorrow after work, I might pull out the tomato plants & spread out a load of manure & coffee grounds. Seems like a long time until its going to be Summer again!

A trip to the Market

May 2, 2009

Me & a friend went to the Salamanca markets today, because we hadn’t been for ages. I really wanted to get some local fruit & veggies, and have a bratwurst. Here are a few pics of the market today, and also my delicious haul! Click to enlarge.

A Day in the Country

December 16, 2008

I have been waiting for the day I could go fruitpicking at Sorell Fruit Farm for weeks now. Today was the day!! I took my sister, an esky, sunscreen, the ute & we were off.

First we headed to the strawberry fields:

strawberry-field

There were so many strawberries!!!! We couldn’t stop picking, and eating:

strawberry-punnet

We ended up getting about 3 kilos of delicious sun-ripened strawberries. We dropped them into the farmhouse for safe-keeping while we picked some cherries:

cherries

Not black cherries but still juicy & delicious. We got about two kilos of these.

I tried to get some peaches but they were very few & too high up… But I did get some Tayberries, which I am told are a cross between blackberries & raspberries and grow on rather sprawling thorny vines.

$40 and 2 hours later, we decided to call it a day and set off back home, and I decided to make strawberry jam!

Any Berry Jam

You will need:

1.5 kilos of Berries, mixed or a single variety

1.5 kilos of white sugar

juice of 1 lemon

50 grams of Jamsetta  (actual ingredient listed is citric acid)

1/4 cup water (only if needed)

Method:

You will need a very large pot for cooking your jam in, as the volume of the liquid expands about 3-fold when boiling.  I had to use 2 pots when I realized it was going to boil over & make a mess!

Also, you will need about 6 sterilized glass jars, and a suitable method of sealing the jars (I know you can get sets with specially designed lids & seals, but I’ve never used them… I used some cellophane ones where you wet the underside & place it over the opening & secure with a rubber band). To sterilize the jars, I chose to be double-safe, and I boiled as well as baked them. Boil for ten minutes, and then (carefully!!) transfer them to the oven for as long as you want (I left mine in the oven while chopping up all my strawberries).

Wash & hull berries, and, depending on your preference, cut them in halves, quarters, or leave them whole (for some berries like raspberries, this isn’t necessary since they break up anyway).

cut-strawberries

In your pot put your fruit, lemon juice & water if needed. Cook over a low heat until fruit is tender. I got onto mine with the potato masher, because I don’t like large fruit pieces in my jam, but go with your preference here.

Add the sugar in the jamsetta/citric acid, and stir to disolve. This is where you have to turn the heat up & boil rapidly for 15-20 minutes. But be very careful of the large increase in volume! Also, bursting bubbles may splatter tiny drops of searing hot syrup, so be careful not to put your face & hands too close to the cooking jam (even if it does smell delicious!).

To test if jam has set, keep a few saucers in the freezer. Dribble a little syrup onto a cold plate after 15 minutes and put back into the freezer until it’s cold. Drag your finger across it – if it wrinkles on the surface it is set. If it doesn’t, keep boiling & test in another 5 minutes. Once your jam is set, turn off the heat & leave it until it’s completely stopped boiling (this can take up to ten minutes). Pouring the jam into the jars was the hardest part for me, first I transfered it into a large bowl with a spout:

red-bowl

But even then some of it spilled down the sides!! I just cleaned them up before I sealed them up.

I made my jam with 1 kilo of strawberries & the rest tayberries, since they were very soft & juicy & not really good for anything else:

tayberries

When I go fruitpicking next time, if I can get a couple of kilos of tayberries I will make tayberry jam aswell.

Here are the finished jars of jams, all different sizes because they are made with recycled jars:

finished-jam

I can’t wait to try some on my toast tomorrow morning!!

Now I am thinking up a recipe for the rest of the strawberries I have left (about 2 kilos). Any idea?